India: Thieves steal onions worth Rs 50,000 but leave cash behind

Onions

[Representational image] | Picture credit: Creative Commons

In a bizarre incident, thieves in India stole onions from a shop but did not even touch the cash box there! The value of the stolen onions is said to be around Rs 50,000.

The incident took place in the East Indian state of West Bengal, where onions are reportedly selling for Rs 100 per kg. That is close to $1.4 per kg.

The usual price of onions in the state ranges from Rs 40 to Rs 50 per kg. That is 55-70 cents per kg.

Onions have become more expensive in the Indian subcontinent, with the price rise most pronounced in Bangladesh.

Onions over cash?

According to a report by news agency Indo-Asian News Service (IANS), the incident took place in the Sutahata area of East Midnapore district in Bengal.

The theft reportedly took place either on the night of Monday, November 25, or in the early hours of the following morning.

The owner of the shop, identified as one Akshay Das, found everything in it scattered when he opened the shutters on Tuesday morning.

Fearing the worst, he first rushed to the cash box, but found the money in there untouched. “They didn’t take a single paisa from the cash box,” he was quoted by the report as saying.

However, on looking around further, he realised several sacks of onions were missing from the shop. The total value of the onions is said to be around Rs 50,000, or around $700.

Thief
[Representational image] | Picture credit: Creative Commons

Expensive vegetables

The prices of vegetables in several parts of the Indian subcontinent are on the rise. For example, prices of onions in Bangladesh have reached Rs 400 per kg in the local currency.

Meanwhile, tomatoes are so dear in Pakistan that some are stationing armed guards in the fields to protect their crops.

In one instance, even a video of a bride wearing jewellery made of tomatoes went viral. However, it could have been a satirical video.

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